Archived | Lexington’s SynapDx gets $2m as it looks to develop new autism test & Press Releases | Circa February 21, 2013 #NotAnAutisticAlly AGRE Collection


SynapDx logo

Lexington’s SynapDx gets $2m as it looks to develop new autism test

By Chris Reidy | Boston.com

SynapDx Corp., a Lexington firm developing diagnostics for the earlier detection of autism, said Thursday that it has gotten $2 million in funding from Laboratory Corporation of America Holdings, or LabCorp, a North Carolina-based company that specializes in testing, genomics, and clinical and anatomic pathology.

SynapDx is looking to develop a blood-based test that can diagnose autism spectrum disorder, or ASD, in children at a very young age. The company has said previously that the average age of an ASD diagnosis with existing methods is 4.5 years old. The hope is that SynapDx’s test will identify children with ASD at age 36 months.

“LabCorp and SynapDx have a shared vision about the future of diagnostics,’’ SynapDx chief executive Stanley Lapidus said in a statement. “The investment is validation of LabCorp’s commitment to innovation and SynapDx’s transformational approach to autism diagnostics.’’

In December, SynapDx announced that it had received $6 million in financing from North Bridge Venture Partners and General Catalyst Partners.


LabCorp Invests $2 Million in SynapDx Corporation

Funding to Support Upcoming Autism Diagnostic Clinical Trials

February 21, 2013 09:00 AM Eastern Standard Time

LEXINGTON, Mass.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–SynapDx Corporation today announced it has secured $2 million in funding from Laboratory Corporation of America® Holdings (LabCorp®) (NYSE: LH). This investment will support the clinical development of SynapDx’s breakthrough blood-based autism spectrum disorder (ASD) diagnostic test, designed to help clinicians identify children with autism earlier than they do today. This test will be the first step toward SynapDx’s building of a broader pediatric neurodevelopment testing offering.

“The investment is validation of LabCorp’s commitment to innovation and SynapDx’s transformational approach to autism diagnostics.”Tweet this

“LabCorp and SynapDx have a shared vision about the future of diagnostics,” said Stanley Lapidus, CEO, SynapDx. “The investment is validation of LabCorp’s commitment to innovation and SynapDx’s transformational approach to autism diagnostics.”

“SynapDx has the potential to revolutionize ASD diagnosis and offer pediatricians, patients and families the opportunity to begin treatment earlier, a key factor in improving ASD outcomes,” said David King, Chairman and CEO, LabCorp. “We are very excited to support SynapDx’s upcoming research efforts.”

LabCorp’s investment follows SynapDx’s recent announcement of a $6 million round in financing supporting further development of its early ASD diagnostic test. SynapDx is working closely with ASD experts at leading institutions across the country and will use the investment to fund further studies slated to begin later this year.

“LabCorp is a leader in diagnostic technology, and its strategic investment in SynapDx demonstrates support for the development of new and better approaches to ASD diagnosis,” said Bill Geary, Partner, North Bridge Venture Partners.

About SynapDx Corp.

SynapDx is a private company providing laboratory diagnostic services to physicians who suspect children of developmental disorders, with the initial goal of enabling earlier detection of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). The company collaborates with ASD experts at leading institutions, including Boston Children’s Hospital. SynapDx was founded in 2010 and is based in Lexington, Mass. Its investors include North Bridge Venture Partners and General Catalyst Partners.

Contacts

Lois Paul and Partners
Susan McCarron, 617-986-5767
Susan_mccarron@lpp.com


SynapDx Corporation Secures $6 Million to Advance Efforts in Early Detection of Autism

Former Genzyme EVP Robert Carpenter Joins Board of Directors of Leading Diagnostics Company

December 11, 2012 09:00 AM Eastern Standard Time

SOUTHBOROUGH, Mass.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–While children can demonstrate symptoms of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) as early as 19 months, the average age of ASD diagnosis is 4.5 years old. Driven by increasing research pointing to the impact of early ASD detection and treatment, SynapDx Corporation has received $6 million in financing from North Bridge Venture Partners and General Catalyst Partners to support further development of its breakthrough blood-based ASD diagnostic test, designed to identify children with ASD by age 36 months.

“SynapDx has proven that it has the right combination of scientific, clinical and entrepreneurial expertise to develop tests that will offer parents and pediatricians a better, faster way to identify these disorders”Tweet this

“SynapDx has proven that it has the right combination of scientific, clinical and entrepreneurial expertise to develop tests that will offer parents and pediatricians a better, faster way to identify these disorders,” said Bill Geary, Partner, North Bridge Venture Partners. “The company’s next phase of clinical development will be critical to thousands of children and their families.”

SynapDx’s blood-test approach measures differences in RNA gene expression to distinguish between children with a higher risk for ASDs from those without. The test could hasten the diagnostic process and help children at risk for ASDs secure access to the right evaluations and treatment as early as possible.

In its first phase, SynapDx obtained an exclusive license to recently-published discoveries from Boston Children’s Hospital. That study demonstrated the potential to identify more children with ASDs than other currently available tests. SynapDx is also working closely with ASD and gene expression experts at leading institutions across the country.

“While one in 88 children in the U.S. are diagnosed with autism, only two in 10 are identified by age 36 months. The diagnostic journey is also long, expensive and confusing for families – making this a clinically important but scientifically overlooked area of research,” said Stanley Lapidus, CEO, SynapDx, who holds more than 30 patents and founded diagnostic companies Cytyc and EXACT Sciences. “Our technology introduces an entirely new category of testing that has the potential to transform pediatrics and give parents and clinicians much-needed answers.”

Funding Lays Foundation for Rapid Growth, Additional Research

SynapDx will use the proceeds to fund further studies, slated to begin in 2013, and further expand its executive team. SynapDx also recently added Robert Carpenter, former lead director of Genzyme Corporation, to its board of directors.

Carpenter founded two life sciences companies, Integrated Genetics and GelTex Pharmaceuticals, both of which went public and were acquired by Genzyme. He also currently serves a director at Moderna and Good Start Genetics.

“Early treatment of autism has proven to yield better patient outcomes, and SynapDx is well-positioned to lead the market in the early diagnosis of this challenging disorder,” said Carpenter. “Initial studies have been promising, and we’re looking forward to our next phase of research.”

About SynapDx Corp.

SynapDx is a private company providing laboratory diagnostics to physicians who suspect children of developmental disorders, with the initial goal of enabling earlier detection of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). The company collaborates with ASD and gene expression experts at leading institutions, including Boston Children’s Hospital. SynapDx was founded 2010 and is based in Southborough, Mass.

Contacts

Lois Paul and Partners
Susan McCarron, 617-986-5767
Susan_mccarron@lpp.com


Science Overview

Autism Spectrum Disorder Background

Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) are pervasive development disorders that are characterized by impairment in language and socialization as well as restricted and repetitive behaviors. According to the Centers for Disease Control, the prevalence among eight year olds is approximately 1%.   

The CDC notes that the average age of diagnosis is 4.5 years, yet age of first concern is 19 months. Early diagnosis leads to early treatment – and early treatment is believed to yield better outcomes. Today, ASDs are diagnosed using a variety of assessments that combine direct patient observation and medical history. ASD diagnosis is often made by developmental pediatricians and other specialists after careful assessment using criteria spelled out in DSM-IV. In larger developmental medicine centers, children are often seen by a team of experts including developmental pediatricians, speech and hearing specialists, neurologists, psychologists, psychiatrists and occupational therapists.  

Gene Expression Approach

Altered RNA expression between ASD and normal individuals using RNA samples derived from peripheral blood was first proposed in 2006 by Valerie Hu. Using lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) established from peripheral blood leukocytes available through the Autism Genetic Resource Exchange (AGRE), Hu and her colleagues identified gene expression signatures that differentiate between ASD and normal twins, between affected and unaffected sibling pairs, and among individuals with different idiopathic ASD diagnoses and unaffected relatives. Similarly, Geschwind and colleagues showed shared and altered expression signatures from different forms of autism involving known chromosomal copy number imbalances using LCL RNA from the AGRE collection.

In gene expression studies using RNA derived from whole blood and natural killer (NK) cells isolated from whole blood, researchers at the Medical Investigation of Neurodevelopmental Disorders (M.I.N.D.) Institute at UC Davis have demonstrated gene expression changes between normal and autistic children.

Most recently, Kohane, Kunkel and colleagues from Children’s Hospital Boston have undertaken a large gene expression study comprising 400 ASD cases and controls and have identified a signature that has robust classification accuracy.

These data suggest that differential expression of certain genes in blood cells may form the basis for an ASD biomarker.  All studies conducted to date have been research studies to distinguish typical development from autism spectrum disorders.    

SynapDx is working to further investigate the ability of an RNA-based blood test to differentiate between patients referred for developmental concern to a specialty center.   The goal is to successfully distinguish between patients with ASDs versus those with other developmental disorders using gene expression in a prospective clinical study.  Additional research will be conducted before this test will become widely available. 

Please refer to Publications for citations. (Below)


Scientific Collaborators

Children’s Hospital Boston / Harvard University


Isaac (Zak) Kohane, MD, PhD

Dr. Kohane is Director of the Children’s Hospital Boston Informatics Program and is the Henderson Professor of Pediatrics and Health Sciences and Technology at Harvard Medical School (HMS). He co-directs the HMS Center for Biomedical Informatics. He has been elected to multiple honor societies including the American Society for Clinical Investigation, the American College of Medical Informatics, and the Institute of Medicine.

Louis Kunkel, PhD

Dr. Kunkel identified the gene and encoded protein, dystrophin, which is mutated in boys with Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy. Recently, he became involved in the genetics of complex traits, including Autism Spectrum Disorders. He is Director of the Program in Genomics at CHB and Professor of Pediatrics and Genetics, HMS. He has received 22 honors including membership in the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Leonard (Lenny) Rappaport, MD, MS

Dr. Rappaport is Chief of Developmental Medicine and Mary Deming Scott Professor of Pediatrics, HMS.  He has directed the Fellowship in Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics for 20 years training 100+ fellows. He is on the Steering Committee of the Boston Autism Consortium and the Subboard in Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics of the American Board of Pediatrics and the American Pediatric Society. He is currently President of the Society of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics.

The George Washington University Medical Center

Valerie Hu, PhD

Dr. Hu is Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. Her interest in the biological basis of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) stems from being the mother of a son with an ASD. Her laboratory uses a systems biology approach integrating large-scale data from genomic, behavioral, genetic, and epigenetic analyses. She received a B.S. with highest honors in Chemistry from the University of Hawaii and a Ph.D. in Chemistry with a minor in Biology from Caltech.


Publications

SynapDx Publications and Presentations:

(Note: Links are pointed to the Internet Archive in this article below.)

Letovsky S, Causey ME, Aryee MJ, Skoletsky J, Proulx C, Sharp FR, Pessah IN, Hansen RL, Gregg J, Hertz-Picciotto I. Distinguishing Autism Spectrum Disorders from Other Developmental Delays Using Blood RNASeq.Poster session presented at: International Meeting for Autism Research, 2013 May 2-4; Donostia, San Sebastian, Spain. 

The following are many of the publications that are relevant to RNA expression and Autism Spectrum Disorders:

Hu VW, Frank BC, Heine S, Lee NH, Quackenbush J.  Gene expression profiling of lymphoblastoid cell lines from monozygotic twins discordant in severity of autism reveals differential regulation of neurologically relevant genes. BMC Genomics 18 7:118 (2006). PMID: 16709250

Hu VW, Nguyen A, Kim KS, Steinberg ME, Sarachana T, Scully MA, Soldin SJ, Luu T, Lee NH.  Gene expression profiling of lymphoblasts from autistic and nonaffected sib pairs: altered pathways in neuronal development and steroid biosynthesis. PLoS One. Jun 3; 4 (6):e5775 (2009). PMID: 19492049

Hu VW, Sarachana T, Kim KS, Nguyen A, Kulkarni S, Steinberg ME, Luu T, Lai Y, Lee NH.  Gene expression profiling differentiates autism case-controls and phenotypic variants of autism spectrum disorders: evidence for circadian rhythm dysfunction in severe autism. Autism Research  2, 78-97 (2009). PMID: 19418574

Nishimura Y, Martin CL, Vazquez-Lopez A, Spence SJ, Alvarez-Retuerto AI, Sigman M, Steindler C, Pellegrini S, Schanen NC, Warren ST, Geschwind DH.  Genome-wide expression profiling of lymphoblastoid cell lines distinguishes different forms of autism and reveals shared pathways. Human Molecular GeneticsJul 15 16 (14), 1682-98 (2007). Epub May 21, 2007. PMID: 17519220

Gregg JP, Lit L, Baron CA, Hertz-Picciotto I, Walker W, Davis RA, Croen LA, Ozonoff S, Hansen R, Pessah IN, Sharp FR.  Gene expression changes in children with autism.  Genomics. Jan 91 (1), 22-9 (2008).  Epub Nov 14, 2007. PMID: 18006270

Enstrom AM, Lit L, Onore CE, Gregg JP, Hansen RL, Pessah IN, Hertz-Picciotto I, Van de Water JA, Sharp FR, Ashwood P.  Altered gene expression and function of peripheral blood natural killer cells in children with autism.  Brain, Behavior, Immunity. Jan 23 (1), 124-33 (2009). Epub Aug 14, 2008. PMID: 18762240

Alter MD, Kharkar R, Ramsey KE, Craig DW, Melmed RD, Grebe TA, Bay RC, Ober-Reynolds S, Kirwan J, Jones JJ, Turner JB, Hen R, Stephan, DA. Autism and increased paternal age related changes in global levels of gene expression regulation. PLoS One. 2011; 6(2):e16715. Epub Feb 17, 2011. PMID: 21379579

Glatt SJ, Tsuang MT, Winn M, Chandler SD, Collins M, Lopez L, Weinfeld M, Carter C, Schork N, Pierce K, Courchesne E. Blood-based Gene Expression Signatures of Infants and Toddlers with Autism. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. 51:9, 934-944e.2 (2012). PMID: 22917206

Kong SW, Collins CD, Shimizu-Motohashi Y, Holm IA, Campbell MG, Lee IH, Brewster SJ, Hanson E, Harris HK, Lowe KR, Saada A, Mora A, Madison K, Hundley R, Egan J, McCarthy J, Eran A, Galdzicki M, Rappaport L, Kunkel LM, Kohane IS. Characteristics and predictive value of blood transcriptome signature in males with autism spectrum disorders. PLoS One.  2012; 7(12):e49475. Epub Dec 5, 2012. PMID: 23227143


Screenshot of About SynapDx

About SynapDx

SynapDx is an early stage laboratory services company developing a blood based test to enable earlier detection of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs). ASDs are characterized by impairment in language and socialization as well as restricted and repetitive behaviors. ASDs affect 1 in 88 children according to the Centers for Disease Control.

The average age of diagnosis is 4.5 years, yet age of first concern is 19 months. Early diagnosis leads to early treatment – and early treatment is believed to yield better outcomes. Today, ASDs are diagnosed using a variety of assessments that combine direct patient observation and medical history. The addition of a clinically meaningful blood test could hasten the diagnostic process and help children at risk for ASDs get access to the right evaluations earlier – and end up with better outcomes as they grow.

SynapDx’s approach measures RNA gene expression differences, which current research suggests can distinguish between people with ASDs and those without. SynapDx is in the process of conducting additional studies to validate this approach.


Clinical Study

SynapDx is currently recruiting patients for a clinical study called STORY. The purpose of the study is to develop a blood test that can identify children who are at a higher risk of being diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs). 

STORY will enroll 660 children ages 18 months to 60months (5 years old) at 20 developmental specialty centers in the US and Canada. This study is specifically recruiting children who have not yet been diagnosed with ASDs. Children who have been previously diagnosed with ASD are not eligible for this study.

Participating sites are listed below:

Site NameSite InvestigatorLocationStudy CoordinatorPhoneEmail
Baylor College of Medicine / Texas Children’s HospitalRobin Kochel PhDHouston, TXSilvia Garza832-824-3393sxgarza3@texaschildrens.org
Children’s Hospital BostonWilliam Barbaresi MDBoston, MASarah Weas857-218-5328Sarah.Weas@childrens.harvard.edu
Children’s Hospital of PhiladelphiaSusan Levy MDPhiladelphia, PASara Nguyen267-426-7165nguyens2@email.chop.edu
Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical CenterLogan Wink MDCincinnati, OHTeri Maraan513-803-3582teri.maraan@cchmc.org
Emory UniversityJeannie Visootsak MDDecatur, GAMeagan Smith404-778-8528meagan.smith@emoryhealthcare.org
Glenrose Rehabilitation HospitalLonnie Zwaigenbaum MDKeith Goulden MDEdmonton, AlbertaCarol WilsonMayank Rehani780-735-8283carol.wilson@albertahealthservices.camayank.rehani@albertahealthservices.ca
Holland Bloorview RehabilitationEvdokia Anagnostou MDToronto, OntarioDina Zaghloul416-425-6220 ext. 6602DZaghloul@hollandbloorview.ca
Institute for Behavioral Research on Staten IslandTed Brown MDStaten Island, NYAnne Gordon718-494-5122anne.gordon@opwdd.ny.gov
Lurie Center Massachusetts General HospitalAnn Neumeyer MDLexington, MAJennifer Mullett781-860-1710jmullett@partners.org
Medical University of South CarolinaMichelle Macias MDCharleston, SCPatricia InfingerAparna Choudhury843-792-7857843-792-1213infingep@musc.educhoudhur@musc.edu
Melmed CenterRaun Melmed MDScottsdale, AZCraig Ciuk480-443-0050 ext. 324craig.ciuk@melmedcenter.com
Miller Children’s HospitalGary Feldman MDLong Beach, CANan O’Donnell562-933-5607nodonnell@memorialcare.org
Mount Sinai School of Medicine / Seaver CenterAlex Kolevzon MDNew York, NYStacey Lurie212-241-3692stacey.lurie@mssm.edu
Nationwide Children’s HospitalDan Coury MDColumbus, OHThomas Whitlow614-355-8389thomas.whitlow@nationwidechildrens.org
Riley Hospital for ChildrenTom Lock MDKimberly Stigler MDIndianapolis, INArlene KohnDawn Graham317-944-1990317-944-1990aekohn@iupui.edudlawrenc@iupui.edu
Rush Medical CenterCesar Ochoa-Lubinoff MDElizabeth Berry-Kravis MDChicago, ILRosa Figueroa312-942-3034Rosa_Figueroa@rush.edu
Seattle Children’s HospitalCharles Cowan MDSeattle, WAAnne Wolken206-987-3195anne.wolken@seattlechildrens.org
The MIND Institute, UC DavisRobin Hansen MDKathleen Angkustsiri MDSacramento, CAJonathan Polussa916-703-0477jonathan.polussa@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu
University of North Carolina – Chapel HillLinmarie Sikich MDChapel Hill, NCKristine BaluyotCheryl Alderman919-972-7497919-972-7447kristine_baluyot@med.unc.educheryl_alderman@med.unc.edu
Vanderbilt UniversityZachary Warren PhDJeremy Veenstra-VanderWeele MDNashville, TNAlison VehornJessica Smith615-343-8763615-936-3288alison.vehorn@vanderbilt.edu

Management Team

Stanley Lapidus, President, CEO and Founder
Stan is an experienced life-science entrepreneur and inventor with over 30 issued US patents. He founded and led Cytyc, EXACT Sciences and Helicos BioSciences (NASDAQ: CYTC, EXAS, HLCS), and holds academic appointments at Tufts and MIT.  From 2002 to 2012 Stan served as a trustee of Cooper Union, his alma mater.
Jeffrey Luber, Vice President Corporate Development and Co-Founder
Jeff is an experienced life sciences executive. He served as President and CEO of EXACT Sciences Corp. (NASDAQ: EXAS) where he led its strategic turnaround and recapitalization. Jeff has served in executive positions in both public and private companies in healthcare and life sciences. He completed his JD and MBA degrees at Suffolk University.
Bobbi Rathmell, MD, Vice President and Medical Director
Bobbi has worked in biotech for the past 5 years at Seaside Therapeutics and Pfizer focused on improving the diagnosis and treatment of people affected by autism. Prior to working in industry she practiced general pediatrics, most recently at the University of Vermont.  She completed her MD and pediatric residency training at Wake Forest University. 
Carla Sivak, RN, Vice President Quality and Regulatory
Carla has extensive experience in medical device quality and regulatory. She has held quality and regulatory leadership positions at Philips Healthcare, Edwards Lifesciences, Boston Scientific, Johnson & Johnson and CR Bard. Carla has a BS in Nursing from the UC San Francisco and an MS Computer Science from Fitchburg State University.  
Theresa Tribble, Vice President of Commercial Strategy
Theresa started her career at Putnam Associates, consulting to the pharmaceutical and medical device industries.  She graduated from Wellesley College and holds an MBA with Distinction from Harvard Business School.  She is a member of the Massachusetts Act Early Task Force.

Board of Directors

Stanley Lapidus, President, CEO and Founder

Stan is an experienced life-science entrepreneur and inventor with over 30 issued US patents. He founded and led Cytyc, EXACT Sciences and Helicos BioSciences (NASDAQ: CYTC, EXAS, HLCS), and holds academic appointments at Tufts and MIT.  Since 2002, Stan has served as a trustee of Cooper Union, his alma mater.

Robert Carpenter

Robert Carpenter is Chairman of Hydra Biosciences Inc., a company he helped found which is conducting research in a new class of ion channels. Previously, he served as Executive Vice President of Genzyme Corporation, and founded two life sciences companies, Integrated Genetics and GelTex Pharmaceuticals, that went public and were acquired by Genzyme. He was a Director of Genzyme from 1994 to 2010 and held the position of Lead Director from 2008 to 2010. In 2002, Mr. Carpenter also helped spin out a subsidiary of Genzyme called Peptimmune Inc., of which he was Chairman of the Board until 2007. He currently serves as a director of Moderna, Good Start Genetics, SynapDx and Immuneering Inc.. He holds a BA from the United States Military Academy at West Point, an MS in Computer Science from Stanford University, and an MBA from Harvard University.

Andrew Conrad, PhD, Google [x]

Andy Conrad oversees two major projects at Google [x], Google Inc’s “moonshot factory” and provides overall guidance on various scientific and hardware products and research. Previously he was Chief Scientific Officer of Laboratory Corporation of America (LapCorp).  He is the co-founder of the National Genetics Institute where he served as Chief Scientific Officer.  Andy also founded the California Health and Longevity Institute (CHLI) and serves as the Chief Scientific Advisor of the North Carolina Research Campus (NCRC), an academic collaboration between Duke University, University of North Carolina and North Carolina State University. Andy holds a Ph.D in Cell Biology from the University of California Los Angeles.

William Geary, North Bridge Venture Partners, Partner

Bill has been with North Bridge since inception in 1994, a leading early-stage venture capital and growth equity investment firm with $3B under management. He invests primarily in healthcare technology. North Bridge investments include Humedica, Healthrageous, Connance, Valence Health, SynapDx, Aushon Biosystems, 480Biomedical, Infomedics, Phase Forward, Pharmetrics, NaviNet and eBenX. Bill is former Chair of Boston College’s Board of Trustees and is a member of its Investment & Endowment Committee. He currently serves on the Advisory Boards of the Center For Connected Health at Partners HealthCare, the Technology Fund of Children’s Hospital of Boston, and the Joslin Diabetes Center. 

Thomas Mac Mahon

Tom was Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer of Laboratory Corporation of America (LabCorp) from 1997 until his retirement in December, 2006.  Previously, he was President of Roche Diagnostics Group from 1988-1996.  He currently serves on the Boards of LabCorp, Express Scripts, Inc. and PharMerica Corp.  He also serves on the Boards of St. Peter’s College and Elon University.  He has an undergraduate degree from St. Peter’s College (1968) and an MBA from Fairleigh Dickinson (1972). 

Hemant Taneja, General Catalyst Partners, Managing Director

Hemant invests in healthcare, clean energy and internet communications. He is co-founder and Chairman of Sunborne Energy.  Hemant co-founded Isovia, later acquired by JP Mobile (MOT).  He co-founded and chairs the New England Clean Energy Council. He holds an M.S. in Operations Research, a BS and MEng in Electrical Engineering & Computer Science, and a BS in Mathematics, Biology & Biomedical Engineering from MIT.


Investors

North Bridge

General Catalyst Partners

Windham Venture Partners

The Kraft Group

Bain Capital Ventures

Google Ventures

LabCorp

CASDIN Capital

Foundation Medical Partners


Working at SynapDx

SynapDx Corporation offers employees the opportunity to work in a fast-paced start-up that values collegiality, commitment, and intellectual rigor while providing excellent leadership and development opportunities. SynapDx is working to advance understanding of autism spectrum disorders through development of laboratory testing services.

If you are interested in submitting your resume for any of our open positions, please send materials to careers@synapdx.com. We review all resumes and will contact you directly if your background and qualifications are a close fit for any of our current openings.

SynapDx Corporation is an equal employment opportunity employer offering a competitive salary and comprehensive benefits package, including stock options, a 401(k) retirement plan as well as health and dental insurance.



Note/Warning:

Autistic people have fought the inclusion of ABA in therapy for us since before Autism Speaks, and other non-Autistic-led autism organizations, started lobbying legislation to get it covered by insurances and Medicaid. 

ABA is a myth originally sold to parents that it would keep their Autistic child out of an institution. Today, parents are told that with early intervention therapy their child will either be less Autistic or no longer Autistic by elementary school, and can be mainstreamed in typical education classes. ABA is very expensive to pay out of pocket. Essentially, Autism Speaks has justified the big price tag up front will offset the overall burden on resources for an Autistic’s lifetime. The recommendation for this therapy is 40 hours a week for children and toddlers.

The original study that showed the success rate of ABA to be at 50% has never been replicated. In fact, the study of ABA by United States Department of Defense was denounced as a failure. Not just once, but multiple times. Simply stated: ABA doesn’t workIn study after repeated study: ABA (conversion therapy) doesn’t work. 

What more recent studies do show: Autistics who experienced ABA therapy are at high risk to develop PTSD and other lifelong trauma-related conditions. Historically, the autism organizations promoting ABA as a cure or solution have silenced Autistic advocates’ opposition. ABA is also known as gay conversion therapy.


The ‘cure’ for Autistics not born yet is the prevention of birth. 

The ‘cure’ is a choice to terminate a pregnancy based on ‘autism risk.’ The cure is abortion. This is the same ‘cure’ society has for Down Syndrome. 

This is eugenics 2021. Instead of killing Autistics and disabled children in gas chambers or ‘mercy killings’ like in Aktion T4, it’ll happen at the doctor’s office, quietly, one Autistic baby at a time. Different approaches yes, but still eugenics and the extinction of an entire minority group of people.


Fact: You can’t cure Autistics from being Autistic.

Fact: You can’t recover an Autistic from being Autistic.

Fact: You can groom an Autistic to mask and hide their traits. Somewhat. … however, this comes at the expense of the Autistic child, promotes Autistic Burnout (this should not be confused with typical burnout, Autistic Burnout can kill Autistics), and places the Autistic child at high risk for PTSD and other lifelong trauma-related conditions.


One Reply to “Archived | Lexington’s SynapDx gets $2m as it looks to develop new autism test & Press Releases | Circa February 21, 2013 #NotAnAutisticAlly AGRE Collection”

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